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Massdrop x NuForce EDC3 In-Ear Monitors

If you're going to use your gear every single day, it's worth upgrading to something that's built for the task. Yes, even your earphones. Whether you're gaming, listening to a podcast, or tuning out the world with the newest bop you can't get enough of, a pair of quality earphones can help open up a whole new level of enjoyment. Plus, they tend to feature better build quality, comfort, and usability for a better overall listening experience. NuForce and Massdrop collaborated on such a pair that was designed specifically for everyday carry, aptly named the EDC. They've teamed up again to bring you the EDC3 as an upgraded bigger brother to the original. It features much of the same great design that made the EDC such a success, but now offers three balanced armature drivers at a compelling $99.99 price point.

Before even getting into how they sound, it's worth noting all the little features on the EDC3 that tackle the challenges of EDCing a pair of earphones in the first place. For many of you, the biggest issue is probably dealing with wires. Cheap wires often tangle and fray, rendering the 'buds useless. The EDC3 comes with not one, but two removable cables depending on your needs. The first is a sturdy yet comfortably flexible braided cable for quality listening sessions, complete with a right angle 3.5mm plug to minimize stress and breakage, as well as built-in cable management for easy carrying. The other cable boasts in-line controls and a microphone to use with your smartphone. It's easy to carry the other cable as a backup even on the go thanks to an included hard zip pouch with an internal mesh pocket, too.

Like the original EDC, the EDC3 uses a durable Lexan polycarbonate to house its internals. The EDC3 housing is both lightweight and compact, making it comfortable to listen to all day. This time around, the entire body is a transluscent dark navy to showcase the arrangement of the EDC3's triple balanced armature drivers. They work together to provide a detailed, all-around experience that still leans towards musical than analytical thanks to its slightly warm sound, defined mids, and controlled bass.

Whether you're an EDC-minded audiophile or looking to finally upgrade your current pair of 'phones, you'd be hard-pressed to find a better value than these. It's not often you see triple balanced armature IEMs under $100. Get them before pre-orders close at the Massdrop link below.

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Reylight Lan v2 Titanium High CRI AA Flashlight

If you asked a flashlight enthusiast ten years ago what EDC lights would look like in 2018, chances are they couldn't have predicted the tiny pocket rockets pushing hundreds of lumens we have on our keychains today. Instead, high-end light designs took a more retro-futuristic approach, looking more like a bona fide lightsaber than a thumb drive. The ReyLight Lan Titanium flashlight is an excellent present-day example of the high design and features that old school “flashaholics” dreamed of, with a price point and availability that's much more accessible to the rest of the EDC crowd. It's based on the familiar and convenient AA form factor, taken to the next level with premium materials and components.

The ReyLight Lan doesn't aim to impress with its total lumen output alone. While it still hits a maximum 390 lumens with a 14500 battery, it has much more to offer to the discerning EDCer. For starters, it uses a 4000K Nichia 219C high CRI LED, which does a much better job at making the colors of your surroundings vivid and lifelike as if they were in sunlight as opposed to the harsh, cold, blue light that most LEDs put out. It also offers a super useful Moonlight mode at 0.2 lumens for preserving night vision and keeping discreet so you don't disturb others when you need a little extra light. Because the Lan can take both a standard AA battery and a lithium rechargeable 14500, its output and runtimes can vary. For more power, use a 14500 to get 390 lumens for 40 minutes on High with 20 days on Moonlight mode. An AA lasts a bit longer at the expense of total output, hitting a max of 110 lumens for 50 minutes and lasting 30 days on Moonlight.

You can find more enthusiast features in the body of the light itself. It's Ti-6Al-4V titanium through and through, down to the tritium-compatible, tailstanding rear click switch. You can also insert tritium vials around the bezel, giving you plenty of ways to customize the light and improve its visibility in a dark pocket or bag. Last but not least, a pocket clip makes it easy to carry and access for EDC. The Lan v2 is available now on Amazon at the link below. If you'd rather wait for mode memory and a bit higher output, check out the updated Lan v3 currently in the works as a fully funded Kickstarter project.

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CRKT M16-02KS

A good pocket knife can be one of those useful tools in your arsenal, but it can also be one of the most expensive. Luckily, that doesn’t have to be the case. When it comes to getting the most bang for your buck few knives did it like the CRKT M16. Designed by the late Kit Carson, the M16's tactical looks, ergonomic handle, and game-changing flipper open mechanism made it an instant EDC classic. The new M16-02KS follows in those same footsteps with upgraded materials and features at an affordable price point, just like the original.

This time around the M16-02KS features a tanto blade made of 12C27 Sandvik steel with a black oxide finish (a step up from the original's 8Cr15MoV), making for a stealthy look that goes hand in hand with its tactical design. The blade itself is roughly 3 inches in length which is perfect for everyday tasks, and the plain edge makes it easy to get the precise cut you want.

A knurled and easy to reach thumb stud allows for one-handed deployment, but also has a Carson flipper opening in honor of the knife maker. The blade now locks with a frame lock mechanism instead of the original's locking liner. The handles get upgraded to 2Cr13 stainless steel, complete with weight-saving holes for a durable knife that won’t weigh your pockets down at 3.7 ounces.

And if you’re looking for versatility, the pocket clip can be mounted in four different positions. So whether you prefer to carry tip-up or tip-down this knife has you covered. For a fresh take on a classic pocket knife, the CRKT M16-02KS is a solid option for anyone that wants a practical blade for EDC but doesn’t want to break the bank.

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