Zebralight SC63 18650 Flashlight

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The deeper you find yourself down the rabbit hole of “serious” flashlights, the more you'll keep hearing the whispers of a particular brand: Zebralight. For many flashaholics, Zebralight is the best place to take your money when it comes to 18650 flashlights, and for good reason. Their lights are cutting edge, built for safety, and highly customizable.

The SC63 is Zebralight's latest and greatest, making use of Cree's new XHP35 LED. This bulb uses its 18650 battery to output a ridiculous 1300 lumens on its highest setting, and also keep a 0.01 lumen setting running for 7.1 months(!). Don't need a light that bright or need a little more power on your low or medium settings? These brightness levels can be adjusted and programmed how you see fit using its soft-touch button interface, giving you a light you can personalize to your needs. The SC63 is smart about these levels, too, as it uses thermal regulation and automatic step-down when the battery's capacity gets low.

You can easily fit the SC63 into your EDC due to its 3.64-inch long body, which is barely larger than the 18650 battery that powers it. At 1.3 ounces it also won't weigh down your pockets, handy when carrying it via its pocket clip. A unibody type-III hard-anodized aluminum construction keeps it lightweight yet durable, with the light able to submerge 2 meters for up to 30 minutes thanks to an IPX-7 water resistance rating.

Zebralight's SC63 could be the light at the end of your EDC search. Pick it up at the Amazon link below, and be sure to also check out the SC63w model for a neutral white option for a more natural tint.

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Discussion (3 total)

One review on Amazon says protected cells won't fit.
No way I am carrying flashlight with unprotected cells in my pack or pocket. Adds a new meaning to teh Brits who call a flashlight a torch ;-)
Saw that review also. Is there a reason they would have chosen to design it that way other than to make it smaller?
Unprotected cells are smaller / slightly cheaper and are simpler in design. However, would you wish to go unprotected? Will you get away with it until it all goes wrong? Much like with or without a condom, you have to know when to quit.