SOG Ultra C-Ti Folding Knife

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When it comes to your everyday carry, doing more with less is always a worthwhile goal. That could mean carrying slimmer, lighter gear, or even essentials with more than one function. SOG Knives have been doing this well with their ultra-slim, credit card-shaped EDC knives that pull double duty as money clips. With the new Ultra C-Ti, they've taken that design up a notch by outfitting it with carbon fiber and titanium—premium materials known for their high strength and low weight.

The Ultra C-Ti's materials and design cues work well together to make this a solid minimalist's knife. It achieves a barely-there 1.3 oz weight thanks to its use of carbon fiber, which lends much needed strength to such a thin, skeletonized frame. The cutouts on the frame don't just cut weight, but they also provide a more secure grip when using a knife this narrow.

The knife deploys with an elongated thumb hole and locks using an ambidextrous Arc-lock. Its VG-10 blade makes up for its modest 2.8” length with a useful clip point shape, plain edge, and generous jimping on the spine.

The Ultra C-Ti does come equipped with a pocket clip. But given how thin and light the knife is, and how most EDC wallets these days struggle with carrying cash, you might appreciate its utility as a money clip instead. Between its wide design and titanium build, it's perfect for the role: titanium retains its springiness well enough to keep your cards and cash secure even over time. And if you'd rather have the lowest profile possible, you can remove the clip altogether for a wallet-friendly form factor.

You can pick up a SOG Ultra C-Ti at the link below to round out your minimalist setup.

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Discussion (3 total)

Nice but expensive! And the lock seems kind of flimsy, I would be worried it breaks and cuts me. Unless it's some kind of very sturdy - but flimsy looking - innovating mechanism. Granted, we're not expected to cut branches with this, but still!
I was looking at the same knife on the same link (I also subscribe), and I agree. I think the Boker would be sturdier.